top of page

Inspirational Women

Oppdatert: 13. mar. 2023

In my previous post, I introduced Ellen Wilkinson as the female pioneer that I will portray in connection with International Women's Day. This is a project I have had going on since 2020 when I developed the reduction Woodcut 'Lilla', a portrait of Norwegian architect Lilla Hansen. After Lilla followed Henrietta Barnett, last year it was Anni Albers, and this year it is Ellen Cicely Wilkinson who is going to be portrayed. Some of the work has been abstract, while others have been inspired by historical photography - because one thing they have in common is that they are all historical figures.

In the process of learning more about Ellen's fascinating life and work as a politician and trailblazer, I came across a picture (below) of her on board a ship. The ship was the RMS Berengaria and docked in Southampton after being in America for the Cunard Line. 'Everything is connected', a professor once pointed out, and in this case, there are many connections. The ship Berengaria was named after the queen who was married to Richard the Lionheart and thus became part of the history of the crusades. Ellen also has a central role here, as an important instigator and contributor to the most famous crusade in recent history, namely the Jarrow crusade in November 1936. Not long after fighting for the marching unemployed, Ellen set course for America - one of many trips she took abroad to be an advocate and to acquire knowledge.

Coincidentally or not, Berengravia's last journey ended in Jarrow, as a piece in a difficult puzzle to reduce unemployment in the northeast of England. Something that is not coincidental is that I chose Ellen Wilkinson, MP for Jarrow, to portray. I live not that far from Jarrow, and I remember exactly the first time I heard about the 200 men and one woman who set foot on the road to London with petitions and signatures – it was during a lecture at my university in Aberdeen (RGU) by Professor Jon Blackwood. And like Ellen, I too am going to Southampton, admittedly not with a 'Royal Mail Ship', but the coincidences probably never stop. Because everything is connected.

I førre innlegg introduserte eg Ellen Wilkinson som den kvinnelege pioneren eg skal portrettera ifb. kvinnedagen. Dette er eit prosjekt eg har hatt gåande sidan 2020, då eg utarbeidde reduksjonstresnittet 'Lilla', eit portrett av den norske arkitekten Lilla Hansen. Etter Lilla fulgte Henrietta Barnett, i fjor var det Anni Albers, og i år er det Ellen Cicely Wilkinson som blir portrettert. Nokre av arbeida har vore abstrakte, medan andre har vore inspirert av historiske fotografi – for éin ting dei alle har til felles er at dei er historiske personar.

I arbeidet med å lære meir om Ellen's fascinerande liv og virke som politikar og føregangskvinne kom eg over eit bilete (under) av henne ombord i eit skip. Skipet var RMS Berengaria og la til kai i Southampton etter å ha vore i Amerika i sitt løp for Cunard Line.

'Alt heng saman' poengterte ein professor ein gong, og i dette tilfellet er det mange samanhengar. Skipet Berengaria fekk namn etter dronninga som var gift med Rikard Løvehjarte og såleis vart ein del av historia om korstog. Her har også Ellen ei sentral rolle, som ei viktig pådrivar og medverkar for det mest kjende korstoget i nyare historie, nemnleg Jarrow-korstoget i november 1936. Ikkje lenge etter å ha kjempa for dei marsjerande arbeidslause sette Ellen kursen for Amerika – ei av mange reiser ho tok utanlands for vera talerøyr, og å tilegna seg lærdom.

Tilfeldig eller ikkje, Berengravia si siste reis enda i nettop Jarrow, som ei brikke i eit vanskeleg puslespel for å redusera arbeidsløysa i nordaust England.

Noko som ikkje er tilfeldig er at eg valgte Ellen Wilkinson, parlamentsmedlem for Jarrow, å portrettera. Eg bur ikkje så langt frå Jarrow, og hugsar nøyaktig første gong eg høyrde om dei 200 menna og éi kvinne som tok beina fatt på veg til London med opprop og underskrifter – under ei førelesing på universitetet i Aberdeen (RGU) ved professor Jon Blackwood.

Og som Ellen, skal også eg til Southampton, riktignok ikkje med eit 'Royal Mail Ship', men tilfeldighetane stoppar nok aldri. For alt har ein samanheng.



Ellen Wilkinson home from US lecture tour . Miss Ellen Wilkinson MP , Middlesbrough East , arrived home at Southampton on the liner Berengaria after her lecture tour in America . Photo shows , Miss Ellen Wilkinson MP on arrival at Southampton . 12 February 1937
Source/kjelde: https://www.alamy.com/ellen-wilkinson-home-from-us-lecture-tour-miss-ellen-wilkinson-mp-middlesbrough-east-arrived-home-at-southampton-on-the-liner-berengaria-after-her-lecture-tour-in-america-photo-shows-miss-ellen-wilkinson-mp-on-arrival-at-southampton-12-february-1937-image359661160.html


News

On March the 8th – aka International Women's Day – the group exhibition 'Inspirational Women Artists 23' opens at GHT in Southampton. I will participate with the print 'Anni', a portrait of last year's pioneer woman, Anni Albers. This is a so-called silent auction, where you can bid on all the artworks on show, which not only means that everyone (not just the wealthy) can have the opportunity to buy art, but also that half of the fee is donated to the charitable organization Yellow Door. The exhibition (and auction) lasts until the 21st of April, it is arranged by 'a space for art' and will hang in 'God's House Tower', a historic building from the 13th century. I will come back with more info when the auction has opened for bids.

Update: the auction is open for bids, my print is featured here.

Den 8. mars – på sjølvaste kvinnedagen – opnar gruppeutstillinga 'Inspirational Women Artists 23' på GHT i Southampton. Eg skal delta med trykket 'Anni', eit portrett av fjorårets pioneerkvinne, Anni Albers. Dette er ein såkalla stille auksjon, kor ein kan by på alle kunstverka, noko som ikkje berre betyr at alle (ikkje berre dei pengesterke) kan få mulighet til å kjøpa kunst, men også at halvparten av honoraret blir donert til den veldelig organisasjonen Yellow Door.

Utstillinga (og auksjonen) varer til 21. april, er arrangert at 'a space for art' og skal hengja i 'God's House Tower', ein historisk bygning frå 1300talet. Eg kjem attende med meir info når det er opna opp for å by.

Oppdatering: auksjonen er no open for budgjeving, mitt trykk kan du finna her.



Anni Albers
'Anni' (2022) monoprint on vintage German Ingres Büttenpapier


Activities

I am starting to get a little tired of listing 'renovation' under activities, but I cannot do anything else. I have decided not to focus on my creative work until I have finished the bedroom, otherwise, it will be too tempting to just leave it half-finished. At the moment I am painting the wooden floor and trying my best to fill the gaps with yarn. The gaps can in some cases be measured in cm rather than mm, which means that it is a time-consuming job. I hope one day I look back on this time and think that I did something right. The positive thing is that I can listen to endless podcasts and radio programmes. If only more sound-friendly content had been created about Ellen Wilkinson...

Eg byrjar å bli litt lei av å lista opp 'oppussing' under aktiviteter, men eg kan ikkje gjera anna. Eg har tatt ei avgjer om å ikkje fokusera på mi kreative verksemd før me er ferdig med soverommet, ellers blir det for fristande å berre la det stå halvferdig. For tida malar eg tregolvet og prøver så godt eg kan å fylla med sprekkene med garntråd. Glipene kan nokre stader målast i cm heller enn mm, som betyr at det er ein tidkrevande jobb å gjera det tett. Eg håpar eg ein dag ser tilbake på denne tida og tenkjer at eg gjorde noko rett. Det positive er at eg kan høyre endelaust mange podkastar og radioprogram. Om det berre hadde blitt laga meir lydvennleg innhald om Ellen Wilkinson…



Recommendations

Talk to your seniors.

Is there not a saying that 'you should listen when old dogs are barking'? Maybe because they know best? Maybe because we can learn something from them? We can certainly learn something from history by listening to our seniors. Many of them are also passionate about sharing and conveying pieces of their history. Like Syd, a volunteer we met at 'Old Low Light' in North Shields on Saturday. Syd acted as a living encyclopedia at this heritage centre which conveys local stories about and from North Shields. He showed a real engagement when we - with visitors from the Seamen's Church in Aberdeen - queried information about the Norwegian Church and the community that once existed here. Although Syd could not help us with this, he had many interesting local stories. There is something unique about hearing such stories, they become bridges that can be created between those who want to tell and those who want to listen and learn. And even if we may not find exactly what we are looking for, we may once again discover that in fact, everything is connected.

Snakk med dei gamle. Er det ikkje eit ordtak som heiter at ein skal høyra når gamle hundar gøyr? Kan hende fordi dei veit best? Kan hende fordi me kan læra noko av dei? Me kan iallefall ganske sikkert læra noko av historia ved å lytta til eldre menneske. Mange av dei er også opptekne av å fortelja og formidla bitar av historia si. Som Syd, ein frivillig me traff på 'Old Low Light' i North Shields på laurdag. Syd verka som eit levande leksikon på dette 'senteret for arv' som formidlar lokale historiar om og frå North Shields. Han viste eit brennande arrangement då me – med besøk frå Sjømannskyrkja i Aberdeen – spurde etter informasjon om den norske kyrkja og samfunnet som ein gong eksisterte her. Sjølv om Syd ikkje kunne hjelpa oss med nett dette, hadde han mange interessante lokalhistoriar. Det er noko unikt med å høyra slike forteljingar. Dei blir til bruer som kan skapast mellom dei som vil fortelja og dei som vil lytta og læra. Og sjølv om me gjerne ikkje finn akkurat det me leitar etter, vil me igjen oppdaga at, alt har ein samanheng.



1 visninger0 kommentarer

Siste innlegg

Se alle

å på K 2.0

In connection with my exhibition at KFUK-hjemmet in London, I have written a text to accompany the show. 'Old houses and farms mean a lot to me' Norwegian author Edvard Hoem says this in an interview

bottom of page